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Mariah Carey 'Might as Well Down this Caymus Bottle' in New Song 'GTFO'; Prosecco Tank Overflows in Viral Veneto Video

Vintner Chuck Wagner reacted to his wine's surprise star turn as America's new go-to cure for messy breakups. Plus, we asked Somm 3's director about his inspo for the movie, out soon
Get The French Oak?
Photo by: Mariah Carey / Vevo
Get The French Oak?

Posted: October 4, 2018

Mariah Carey is coming out with her first new album in four years, and it might be an ode to wine. The first song released, sassy break-up ballad "GTFO," describes Carey ditching a zero to get with a hero—a bottle of Caymus Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon, specifically. In the song and accompanying video, the diva legend trills, wineglass in hand, that she "could've sworn you loved me harder / Might as well down this Caymus bottle” to help put her no-good ex in the rearview.

Reference to the Napa winery didn’t go unnoticed by fans, many of whom took to social media to share videos and memes of themselves with a glass (or bottle) of Caymus, and a number of whom have called the source in Napa looking to buy their own bottles of heartbreak salve, the winery told us. Carey herself tweeted this week, "Caymus 2014 is one of my favorite wines ever!" to which the vineyard's social media account swooned, "Mariah + Caymus = We Belong Together," a nod to another of Carey's hit singles.

But the history is undeniable: "Mariah came to Caymus Vineyards some years ago, and I was pleased to personally taste and tour her and a guest," vintner Chuck Wagner told Unfiltered. "Of course we would love for her to make a return visit any time she is in the area." (A little more history: With the fruits of one specific vintage, Carey and Caymus would reach their respective fields' top spots, with her debut album eventually topping the music charts and their Cabernet snagging Wine of the Year—that was 1990.)

“We’re appreciative that Mariah thought of Caymus during her creative process,” added Wagner. “We can only imagine what goes into writing a song, but we can relate to the work and even the struggle behind it. Probably not so different from creating a great bottle of wine.”

In the brief time since "GTFO" dropped, Carey released another new song—today—"With You," which is more Cognac-flavored: Rémy Martin gets the mention. Onetime Carey favorite Champagne, alas, has evidently been sent TFO.


Prosecc—Oh No! Fermentation Tank Overflows, Spilling Thousands of Gallons of Booze in Viral Veneto Video Fail

Don't bother pouring one out for the poor folks involved in the latest vinous viral video—there has already been plenty of innocent booze spilled: Last week, Italian wine shop L'Enoteca Zanardo Giussano posted footage on Facebook of a giant fermentation silo hemorrhaging copious amounts of what is likely would-be Prosecco.

The spillage, which took place last month, reportedly occurred at a large, unnamed winery in the Prosecco DOC area, in the village of Fontanelle. Though the post identified the beverage in the waterfall as Prosecco, according to Prosecco DOC Consortium director Luca Giavi, it could've been something else. "In those areas there is a significant production of other types of wines," Giavi told Unfiltered. ("Trebbia—No Bueno!" "Soay Vey!")

In any case, some Italian winery has a big cleanup on its hands. According to the Facebook post, the overflow could have resulted in a loss of as many as 30,000 liters (or 8,000 gallons) of wine, an estimate that Umberto Cosmo of Conegliano-based producer Bellenda thinks checks out. He broke down a scenario for us:

"What you saw on the Internet is something that can happen when a tank, during the first few days of the fermentation process, has a smaller-than-required space to allow the expansion that occurs during this fermentation phase. In particular, this harvest has been characterized by a maturation of grapes that occurred in a shorter timeframe than usual, so some wineries, overwhelmed by grapes arriving from growers, filled the tanks over the level that is considered safe for fermenting.

"When such things happen, you may easily lose up to half of the tank, so the estimate of 30,000 liters lost is not far from real."

Among all the layperson Facebook comments, posted in a number of different languages, one "Giuliano" summed up his take more succintly: "Noooooo."


Director Jason Wise Gives Us 'Somm 3' Sneak Peek, Coming Soon to Theater Near You (and John Legend)

Grab your popcorn and favorite glass of wine, Somm 3 is here. The third installment of the enophile trilogy will be screening in Orlando, Denver, New York, Santa Barbara, San Francisco and beyond in the coming days and weeks, including a run at the Cameo Cinema in St. Helena from Oct. 19 to 25. It hits iTunes Nov. 30.

We got a sneak peek at the second follow-up to the 2013 documentary, and found it focused, detailed and harmonious. DLynn Proctor, Ian Cauble, Brian McClintic and Dustin Wilson (the diligent young wine disciples pursuing their Master Sommelier degrees in the course of the original Somm) all make appearances, but director and producer Jason Wise told Unfiltered he had been meditating more on the nuances of age lately.

Wise's 2017 non-wine movie documentary, Wait for Your Laugh, told the story of Rose Marie, who had a 90-year career in show business. Spending all of that time with an older subject, “made me realize young people don’t know shit,” explained Wise. “I didn’t want [Somm 3] to only be about young people. It was more important to hear from" more matured figures in the wine scene too.

So the film takes a walk down memory lane, gathering Master Sommelier Fred Dame, wine writer Jancis Robinson and British merchant Steven Spurrier to reflect on their lives in wine and revisit their “a-ha” wine bottles in one sentimental exchange. Meanwhile, the younger somm crew busy themselves setting up a blind tasting, with the expected wine-geek discussions throughout. (“The Wine Spectator Grand Award is the brass ring that wine-savvy restaurateurs are going for,” notes one particularly astute and discerning character during the proceedings.)

Courtesy of Jason Wise
A mixed case of assorted wine pros on set during Somm 3 filming

As for what’s next? Wise told us he has some more wine projects in mind, including a nature documentary about the world of wine. Or ask him yourself: The director will be at several of the upcoming screenings to chat about the film, sometimes over some wine. (Find a theater near you!) It'll give you something to gab about next time you run into model/actor/cookbook author Chrissy Teigen, who this week tweeted a wine-whimsical review: "Going to force John [Legend, her husband and noted vintner/wine hacker] to watch Somm—my 3rd time but it's still delightful to me, like a freshly cut garden hose or the scent of a can of tennis balls, very earthy and indigenous to the northernmost point of Tuscany."


Scott Crawford, Top Carolina Chefs to 'Come Together for the Coast' in Food-and-Wine Hurricane Relief Fêtes; José Andrés Cooks Up Thousands of Meals on the Ground

Hurricane Florence ripped through the Carolinas last month, stirring up floods and tornadoes, dumping record amounts of rain, and leaving behind damage that may put it in league with some of last year's superstorms in terms of destructive cost. But as in the wake of Harvey, Maria and Irma last fall, local food and wine communities are rallying to raise money for relief, drumming up star power and resources to host a good time for a good cause.

The Sunday Supper
Chefs Jake Wood (left) and Scott Crawford, with Sunday Supper board chair Willa Kane

The festivities start this Sunday, Oct. 7, at the Dillon in Raleigh, N.C., with a "Come Together for the Coast" dinner and auction, a collaboration between the Supper Table series of charity events and chefs like Scott Crawford (Crawford and Son), Jake Wood (18 Seaboard), Vivian Howard (Chef and the Farmer, the Boiler Room) and Beth LittleJohn (Players' Retreat). “From farmers and fishermen to restaurateurs, we have one of the richest food communities in the country," said Crawford to Unfiltered via email. "These small, family-owned businesses who feed us every day have been devastated. Now it’s our turn to take care of them."

We got a peek at the menu and spied dishes like scallop aguachile, tomatillo “caviar” and sesame rice puff, as well as duck confit tostada, white bean puree, roasted poblano and maduros with cilantro chimichurri. Wine companies Queen of Wines and Advintage Distributing will be providing pours, including Bedrock rosé and old-vine Zinfandel, Hirsch San Andreas Fault Pinot Noir 2014, Vivacé, a bubbly from Oregon's Montinore Estate, and Riesling and Pinot Noir from State of Mind Wines. The evening's auction lots should excite wine lovers as well, with a stay at Georgia's Sea Island Resort and dinner prepared by chef Danny Zeal among them, as well as two nights at Smoky Mountains destination and Wine Spectator Grand Award winner Blackberry Farm.

Then, on Nov. 11, the Sunday Supper will host a community lunch for 1,000 diners in downtown Raleigh; Crawford and some friends will also be putting together the menu for that party. Proceeds for both this weekend's dinner and next month's lunch go toward the Sunday Supper Gift Fund of the North Carolina Community Foundation; tickets to both are still available.

We'd be remiss not to mention chef-humanitarian José Andrés, whose hunger heroics after Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico have helped turn his World Central Kitchen into a fine-tuned, food-dispensing, disaster-battling machine. The Spanish-American chef once again brought his mobile kitchens into the storm zone, setting up shop in Wilmington, N.C., doling out tens of thousands of meals in the immediate aftermath of Florence and posting status updates along the way:


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