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Jennifer Lawrence Juggles Wine, Wolfgang Puck('s Photog) Fights Crime at Oscars

Plus, a cult Burgundy winemaker returns to his silver-screen former life in a new movie, and Pommery sparkles at the Armory Show art extravaganza
Jennifer Lawrence makes her way from point A to point B as the sparrow flies.
Photo by: Nick Argo & Matthew Masin/AMPAS
Jennifer Lawrence makes her way from point A to point B as the sparrow flies.

Posted: March 8, 2018

Jennifer Lawrence, Hollywood's most A+ (wine) lister, didn't clutch a statuette at this year's Oscars but instead held tight to an even more favored accessory—a glass of Chardonnay. On Sunday night, as stars gathered for the 90th Academy Awards ceremony, Lawrence was spotted with wineglass in hand, chatting with the likes of Meryl Streep, Woody Harrelson, Salma Hayek and her BFF Emma Stone. Though her sparkly dress and fancy shoes had the fashion world atwitter, Unfiltered was far more impressed to watch the notoriously clumsy J-Law clamber over a row of theater seats whilst balancing her (very generously poured) stem of Francis Ford Coppola Oscars 90th Edition Director's Cut 2016 Chardonnay.

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Fittingly the sole non-bubbly wine provider for the Academy Awards, Coppola's winery poured more than 14,000 glasses of Chardonnay, Director’s Cut Sauvignon Blanc 2016, Reserve Pinot Noir 2016 and Archimedes Cabernet blend 2014 at the show and Governor's Ball after-party. Piper-Heidsieck Champagne reprised its vinous cohosting duties, popping more than 1,500 bottles of Cuvée Brut Limited Edition, Cuvée Rare 2002 and Cuvée Rare 1998.

But while Guillermo del Toro waited with a flute of bubbly for his Best Director statuette to be engraved, and actress Maya Rudolph clinked glasses with costume designer Mark Bridges, something dastardly was afoot. Amid the revelry, Frances McDormand realized her briefly unattended statuette for Best Actress had been stolen. What ensued was a drama fit for the big screen.

In a made-for-Unfiltered coincidence of celebrity, cookery and shenanigans, longtime Oscars caterer-to-the-stars and Spago proprietor Wolfgang Puck was pulled into the caper … or, at least, his photographer was. While the toque was busy prepping 300 pounds of Miyazaki wagyu beef, 100 pounds of New York filet and more, for 1,500 hungry gala-goers, a photographer documenting his edible wares was able to snap a photo of the thief, and valiantly wrested McDormand's prize back before the bandit made his escape. The thief was arrested, and McDormand was saved the trouble of again renting billboard space to implore a crime be solved.


Chard Star Jean-Marc Roulot Goes Back to Acting in 'Back to Burgundy'

You may know him as one of Meursault's foremost maestros, but before he went back to Burgundy following his father's death, Jean-Marc Roulot was making his mark in Parisian film circles, appearing in the 1988 hit Story of Women. Now, Roulot is back to the movies, "playing" a winemaker in director Cédric Klapisch's new film, called—to bring things full circle—Back to Burgundy. The 2017 film is making its stateside debut March 23.

Roulot acted in two of Klapisch’s past films, including his first feature, Little Nothings, and he told Unfiltered via email about the chance to unite his two callings in a wine drama. “[Cédric and I] have known each other for a long time and Cédric, a wine lover, knew about my other career. He came to the winery several times and told me about the idea of making a ‘wine film.’ He started to do some research in 2010, and then came to take pictures during our harvest.”

The plot is not unlike Roulot's own life: 30-something Jean (Pio Marmaï) returns from years of traveling to his family’s estate in the titular region, where he finds his siblings Juliette (Ana Girardot) and Jérémie (François Civil) struggling in the wake of their father’s death. They must decide the future of the winery and resolve their own issues, while estate manager Marcel (that's Roulot) lends a guiding hand in the winemaking.

Klapisch said in a prerelease Q&A with Music Box Films that filming felt at times more like making a documentary than a feature. The team filmed the (real) Roulot harvest in 2015 for research, later hiring the grape pickers to act as extras in the movie. The three actors depicting the siblings arrived at the vineyard three days before shooting began for an "intensive apprenticeship," which began with lunch and eight pours of Pinot and Chardonnay. “It was a way to ‘discover the terroir,’” Klapisch said. “By 2 p.m., they were already completely drunk.” But observing them came in handy when the canny auteur had to film a particularly freewheeling scene of revelry.

Roulot, for his part, also coached the actors through details like how to hold a glass, taste (and spit) wine, and how to talk about technical details like deciding when to harvest—as well as correcting their “Parisian language.”

“The world of wine is often caricatured in the cinema, but this time the winegrowers were able to find themselves in this fiction,” Roulot said. “The reception of the film here in Burgundy was very warm.” See if the film's coming to a theater near you.


What’s Full of Gas and Invited to All the Best Gallery Openings?

No, it's not Unfiltered. It’s Champagne! So despite the thundersnow of Winter Storm Quinn last night, we jumped at the chance to preview New York's annual Armory Show art fair, held not at any of the city's numerous famed armories but at Piers 94 and 92 on Manhattan's West Side. The preview was courtesy of Pommery, which is hosting a Champagne lounge at the front and center of the fair, today through Sunday. "We truly believe that being involved in art is the way of the future," Champagne Pommery co-owner Nathalie Vranken told Unfiltered. "Contemporary art takes you far away. … It is important for us to be here, on another continent." Vranken and her husband, Paul-François, have showcased hundreds of artists at their annual Pommery Expérience exhibitions, held in the estate’s cellars since they acquired it in 2002.

Pommery
Pommery pops at the Armory.

“Why contemporary art?” Nathalie mused. “Contemporary art is alive! I would love to have a conversation with Van Gogh, but I am too late. … [Pommery’s support of the arts] started with Madame Pommery in the 19th century … and now, we are France’s first underground art museum!” The bubbly will also be served at the fair's Hôtel Americano pop-up restaurant.

And where there's fine art, there's bound to be an Italian contingent. Alessia Antinori, "the artistic one" of the new generation running Tuscany's Marchesi Antinori winemaking empire, will be hosting a panel discussion of art-world trends on Saturday, March 10, at the Roxy Hotel in Tribeca. Among the panelists will be Italian artist Stefano Arienti, whom Antinori commissioned to create a modern interpretation of the Renaissance ceramic tableau Resurrection of Christ, once owned by the Antinori family—and featuring the historical Antinori who commissioned it. “As winemaking itself is an art form, supporting and celebrating the fine arts has always been a cornerstone of the Antinori family, dating back to the Renaissance,” Antinori said in a statement. “Over the centuries, we have observed the ways art can influence and reflect our society and have carried that spirit with us into the contemporary landscape … especially at a time when advocating for artistic expression is so crucial in our world.”


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