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2014 Bordeaux Futures Price Chart

Montrose releases late and goes big; Your guide to prices of Bordeaux's latest vintage

Mitch Frank, Emma Balter
Posted: April 29, 2015

Updated June 2, 2015

Should you buy 2014 Bordeaux futures? The en primeur system allows wine lovers to secure bottles of top classified growths while the wines are still aging in château cellars. Ideally, consumers get the wine at a cheaper price than when it's released two years later. But that isn't always the case, and recent vintages of many wines have not appreciated.

This year, retailers, négociants and consumers are all watching closely to see where châteaus set prices. The wineries argue that 2014 is the best vintage since 2010, and thus the wines should cost more than the disappointing 2013s. That said, consumers stayed away from the 2013 futures because the prices were considered too high. And while the 2014 wines show promise, they're not as high in quality as 2009 and 2010. (See Wine Spectator senior editor James Molesworth's barrel sample reviews).

The wild card is currency—the U.S. dollar has strengthened dramatically while the euro has weakened in the past six months. So American consumers have a stronger hand. Château owners may be counting on the fact that they can raise prices and yet American buyers will still pay less than they did last year.

Our chart below shows scores and prices from leading American retailers for some of Bordeaux's top estates, as well as comparisons to the past two vintages. Check back daily for new updates and analysis.

Released June 2, 2015 (Exchange rate: €1 = $1.115)

Montrose St.-Estèphe's Château Montrose released late, pricing its first tranche at €88.8 per bottle ex-négociant, up 54.2 percent on both the 2013 and 2012 futures. The steep price hike surprised some, but Montrose has been gaining notice with improving quality recently. Wine Spectator gave the 2014 in barrel 94 to 97 points, with senior editor James Molesworth praising its "wonderful purity." The wine should retail in the U.S. for about $125, or $1,500 a case, a 32 percent increase from the 2013 futures and a 39 percent hike from the 2012s. That means wine lovers can buy most ready-to-drink vintages already on store shelves for cheaper.

Released May 28, 2015 (Exchange rate: €1 = $1.089)

Cheval Blanc St.-Emilion superstar Cheval Blanc released its first tranche at €360 per bottle ex-négociant, up 20 percent on its 2013 futures and 6 percent on the 2012s. Wine Spectator gave the 2014 in barrel 96 to 99 points, with senior editor James Molesworth calling it a gorgeous wine. That comes at a price—the wine should retail in the U.S. for about $450, or $5,400 a case, a 3 percent drop from the 2013 futures and a 10 percent drop from the 2012s. That's cheaper than all of the current vintages on the market, which should please loyal fans. But Bordeaux's top wines have appreciated slowly in recent years, so many buyers may choose to wait.

Released May 27, 2015 (Exchange rate: €1 = $1.090)

Vieux Château Certan Pomerol's Vieux Château Certan released its 2014 futures at €102 per bottle ex-négociant, up 13.3 percent on both 2013 and 2012 futures. Wine Spectator gave the 2014 in barrel 94 to 97 points, with senior editor James Molesworth noting its "beautiful mouthfeel and depth." The wine should retail in the U.S. for about $135, or $1,620 a case, a 7 percent drop from the 2013 futures and a 5 percent drop from the 2012s. That makes this the cheapest vintage of VCC on the market—not dramatically cheaper, but enough to make this increasingly popular wine an attractive buy.

Released May 21, 2015 (Exchange rate: €1 = $1.102)

Léoville Las Cases Château Léoville Las Cases has released at €96 per bottle ex-négociant, up 21.5 percent on 2013 futures and up 12.9 percent on 2012 futures. Wine Spectator gave the 2014 in barrel 94 to 97 points, with senior editor James Molesworth calling it a pure, focused wine. The wine should retail in the U.S. for about $120, or $1,440 a case. That's a 4 percent drop on 2013 futures and a 5 percent drop on 2012 futures, putting the 2014 futures at a lower price than most vintages on the market.

Pichon Longueville Lalande Pauillac's Pichon Lalande released its 2014 futures at €64.8 per bottle ex-négociant, up 12.5 percent on both 2012 and 2013 futures. Wine Spectator gave the 2014 in barrel 92 to 95 points. The wine should retail in the U.S. for about $90, or $1,080 a case. Thanks to the weak euro, that's a 10 percent drop on 2013 futures and almost equal to 2012 futures. It's not a huge savings on recent vintages, but cheaper than most ready-to-drink vintages on the market.

Released May 21, 2015 (Exchange rate: €1 = $1.111)

Léoville Poyferré

Château Léoville Poyferré released its first tranche of futures at €44.4 per bottle ex-négociant, up 15.9 percent on 2013 and up 3 percent on 2012. Wine Spectator gave the 2014 in barrel 92 to 95 points. The wine should retail in the U.S. for about $60, or $720 a case. That's an 8 percent drop on 2013 futures and a 17 percent drop on 2012 futures. It's cheaper than most vintages currently available on the market.

Released May 20, 2015 (Exchange rate: €1 = $1.109)

Léoville Barton St.-Julien estate Léoville Barton released its first tranche of futures at €44 per bottle ex-négociant, up 3.5 percent on both the 2013 and 2012 futures. Wine Spectator gave the 2014 in barrel 92 to 95 points, with senior editor James Molesworth calling it a polished, lovely wine. The euro dipped again today, putting the wine at about $60 at U.S. retail, or $720 a case. That's a 15 percent drop on 2013 futures and a 14 percent drop on 2012 futures and cheaper than vintages currently available on the market, making the 2014 a tempting buy for those who enjoy this reliably outstanding wine.

Pape Clément Château Pape Clément released its first tranche of futures at €49.8 per bottle ex-négociant, equal to the 2013 futures and down 0.4 percent on the 2012 futures. Wine Spectator gave the 2014 in barrel 91 to 94 points. With the strong dollar, the Pape Clément 2014 should retail at about $65 in the U.S., or $780 a case, nearly 22 percent lower than 2013 futures and 18 percent lower than 2012 futures. That makes the 2014s cheaper, sometimes dramatically so, than vintages currently available on the market, attractive to fans of the wine's powerful style.

Released May 19, 2015 (Exchange rate: €1 = $1.115)

Pavie Like Angélus, Château Pavie was promoted to St.-Emilion's top tier in 2012. The 2014 was released at €180 per bottle ex-négociant, up 9.1 percent on 2013 futures and equal to the 2012 futures. Wine Spectator gave the 2014 in barrel 94 to 97 points. With the dollar strengthening again today, the futures should retail for about $225, or $2,700 a case. That's 16 percent less than the 2013 futures and almost 19 percent less than the 2012s. However, the 2008s and 2011s can be found on the market for cheaper, which may make some Right Bank aficionados hold off for now.

Released May 18, 2015 (Exchange rate: €1 = $1.139)

Figeac Several Right Bank estates released futures today, led by St.-Emilion's Figeac. The managers priced the first tranche at €60 per bottle ex-négociant, up 25 percent on 2013 futures. Wine Spectator gave the 2014 in barrel 93 to 96 points, one of the best results in several years for the historic estate, which has been under a new manager since 2013. It should retail for about $80 at U.S. retail, or $960 a case. That's a significant savings over most recent vintages on the market. Between the price and the improved potential quality of the wine, St.-Emilion fans interested in futures may scoop this up.

Smith-Haut-Lafitte Pessac-Léognan's Smith-Haut-Lafitte released its first tranche at €45.6 per bottle ex-négociant, up 18.8 percent on 2013 futures and up 11.8 percent on 2012 futures. Wine Spectator gave the 2014 in barrel 93 to 96 points. Thanks to the exchange rate, it should retail for about $60 at U.S. retail, or $720 a case. For American consumers, that's a savings on most recent vintages on the market from a popular producer.

La Conseillante Pomerol's La Conseillante was released today at €66 per bottle, up 15.8 percent on 2013 and up 14.6 percent on 2012. It should retail for about $90 at U.S. retail, or $1,080 a case. That's similar to the past two vintages when they were offered as futures, and cheaper than most recent vintages on the market.

Released May 13, 2015 (Exchange rate: €1 = $1.137)

Haut-Bailly Pessac-Léognan's Château Haut-Bailly released at €43.2 per bottle ex-négociant, up 9.1 percent on 2013 and up 2.9 percent on 2012. The futures should retail for about U.S. $60, a drop of 9 percent on both the 2012s and 2013s as futures. That's a substantial savings compared to most of the vintages currently on the market, making this a wine that may do well in America but attract less attention in Europe.

Pavie Macquin St.-Emilion's Pavie Macquin released at €40.8 per bottle ex-négociant, up 33.3 percent on 2013 and up 17.2 percent on 2012. Wine Spectator gave the 2014 in barrel 93 to 96 points. It should retail for about $58 at U.S. retail, or $696 a case. That's more than 9 percent higher than the 2013s and almost 2 percent higher than the 2012s were as futures. It's cheaper than current market prices of recent vintages, but not by much.

Rauzan-Ségla Margaux's Château Rauzan-Ségla has released their first tranche at €38.5 per bottle ex-négociant, up 16.7 percent on 2013 and up 5.5 percent on 2012. Wine Spectator gave the 2014 in barrel 89 to 92 points. With the exchange rate and markups, the wine should retail for about $55 in the U.S., or $660 a case, almost 2 percent lower than the 2013 and 7 percent lower than the 2012. It's also cheaper than every vintage currently on the U.S. market, so fans of this wine may want to consider scooping it up.

Released May 12, 2015 (Exchange rate: €1 = $1.122)

Lafite Rothschild The last of the Left Bank first-growths that will sell futures has announced its price (Latour no longer plays the futures game). Château Lafite Rothschild released its first tranche at €288 per bottle ex-négociant, the same price as the 2013 and down 14 percent on the 2012. Wine Spectator gave the 2014 in barrel 94 to 97 points. With the exchange rate, that prices Lafite at approximately $400 a bottle at U.S. retail, or $4,800 a case, a 15 percent drop on 2013 and a 25 percent drop on 2012, making the 2014 the cheapest vintage available. But it's also $80 more than fellow firsts Mouton, Margaux and Haut-Brion—Lafite enjoyed the biggest price increases a few years ago when the wines were in heavy demand in China.

Pontet-Canet Château Pontet-Canet released its wines at €66 per bottle ex-négociant, the same price as the 2011 and up 10 percent on both the 2013 and 2012 vintages. By the time U.S. retailers offer the futures, they should be priced around $95 a bottle, or $1,140 a case. That's 5 percent less than the 2013s were released at but is slightly higher than the 2012s on release. While it's not a huge savings over other vintages on the market, the under $100 price tag may hold appeal.

Released May 11, 2015 (Exchange rate: €1 = $1.116)

Margaux Château Margaux's staff started the new week's releases, pricing their futures at €240 per bottle ex-négociant, the same price as the 2012 and up 11 percent on the 2013. The 2014 price matches Mouton-Rothschild's and Haut-Brion's prices. Wine Spectator gave the 2014 in barrel 94 to 97 points. Thanks to the strong dollar, down on Monday after rising last week, Margaux will retail for around $315 in the U.S., or $3,780 a case. That's an 11 percent decrease from the 2013 on release and a 15 percent drop on the 2012. The 2014 is cheaper—in many cases, dramatically cheaper—than most of the vintages on the market, making it attractive to collectors with first-growth budgets.

Released May 7, 2015 (Exchange rate: €1 = $1.135)

Issan Margaux's Château d'Issan released at €30 per bottle ex-négociant, up 13 percent on 2013 and up 7 percent on the 2012. Wine Spectator gave the 2014 in barrel 86 to 89 points. Thanks to the strong dollar, it should retail for about $45 in the U.S., or $540 a case. That's a 6 percent drop on both the 2012 and 2013 at retail and less than most of the current vintages on the market, making it a good deal for fans of the wine.

Released May 6, 2015 (Exchange rate: €1 = $1.127)

Pichon Baron The second-growth from Pauillac, officially known as Château Pichon-Longueville Baron, released first on May 6, pricing its initial tranche of 2014 futures at €66 per bottle ex-négociant, up 22 percent on 2013 and up 1.5 percent on 2012. Wine Spectator gave the 2014 in barrel 92 to 95 points. Even with the strong dollar, Pichon should cost about $90 at U.S. retail, or $1,080 a case—almost identical to the 2013 release and a 10 percent drop on 2012 retail prices. That puts it fairly close to other recent vintages—not a big savings.

Giscours The Margaux estate released at €27.60 per bottle ex-négociant, up 10.6 percent on the 2013 release and up 4.5 percent on the 2012. Wine Spectator gave the 2014 in barrel 90 to 93 points. At this price, the wine should cost abut $39 at U.S. retail, or $468 a case, a 7 percent decrease on price of both the 2013 and the 2012 when those wines were released as futures. It's also cheaper than most of the older vintages on the market, which should make the wine attractive to drinkers who like Giscours' fresh, elegant style.

Gruaud-Larose The St-Julien château released at at €39.5 a bottle ex-négociant, up 18 percent on both the 2013 and 2012 vintages. Wine Spectator gave the 2014 in barrel 89 to 92 points. The strong dollar makes this cheaper for Americans, at about $55 U.S. retail, or $660 a case, nearly identical to the 2013s. But the 2011s and 2012s, already released, are selling for a similar price.

Released May 5, 2015 (Exchange rate: 1€ = $1.119)

Haut-Brion After a long holiday weekend in France, Haut-Brion and several other top names restarted the action on May 5. The oldest first-growth released its first tranche of 2014s at €240 per bottle ex-négociant, up 11.6 percent on its 2013 release price and equal to the 2012 release price. Thanks to the weak euro, that translates into a U.S. retail price of approximately $315, or $3,780 a case—an 11.3 percent drop on 2013 retail prices and a 16 percent drop on the 2012s at release—making this the second-cheapest recent vintage on the market. Only the poorly regarded 2013s cost less. Wine Spectator gave the 2014 in barrel 95 to 98 points. The price should prove tempting for American collectors who regularly buy first-growths—though that's a shrinking group in recent years.

Cos-d'Estournel Cos-d'Estournel released at €84.5 per bottle ex-négociant, up 3.7 percent on the 2013 and down 3.9 percent on the 2012. That translates into a U.S. retail price of about $110, or $1,320 a case, a 16.7 percent drop on the 2013s. Long a favorite of U.S. collectors, Cos-d'Estournel's future sales have suffered in recent years, according to American retailers, as prices have risen. While the 2014 is cheaper than the wines from the blockbuster 2009 and 2010 vintages, several other recent vintages are available for less.

Troplong Mondot St.-Emilion's Troplong Mondot released its first tranche at €57.6 ex-négociant, up 9.1 percent from its 2013 release and 6.7 percent from its 2012 release price. That should lead to a U.S. retail price of $79 a bottle, or $948 a case. Thanks to the weak euro, that's 12 percent less than the 2013s and a 6 percent drop on the 2012s. It's comparable to other recent vintages on the market, except for the 2009s and 2010s, which could lead consumers to opt for older vintages that are ready to drink. Wine Spectator gave the 2014 in barrel 92 to 95 points.

La Mission Haut-Brion Haut-Brion's neighbor, also owned by Domaine Clarence Dillon, released a few hours after the first-growth at €145 per bottle ex-négociant, up 20.8 percent on the 2013 release and down 3.3 percent on the 2012. That should translate to a U.S. retail price of $190 per bottle or $2,280 a case, a 1 percent drop in price from the 2013s and a 16 percent drop from the 2012s. Wine Spectator gave the 2014 in barrel 93 to 96 points. The 2014 price is similar to other recent vintages on the market, except for the 2009s and 2010s.

Released April 29, 2015 (Exchange rate: 1€ = $1.112)

Palmer This super-second came out at €160 ex-négociant—a 6.7 percent increase on 2013—or $178. At retail, that translates to about $206, or $2,472 a case. The barrel sample scored 93 to 96 points, up from 90 to 93 for the 2013. This is a wine that may be more appealing to Americans than Europeans. Thanks to the strong dollar, that $206 price is 15 percent cheaper than the 2012 and 2013 release prices. But there are older vintages currently on the market for less.

Angélus The St.-Emilion château released at €180 per bottle, up 9.1 percent on 2013 and the same price as the 2012. Thanks to the dollar, that translates into a retail price of approximately $230, down 13 percent from last year. Wine Spectator gave the barrel sample 93 to 96 points. The price makes this the cheapest recent vintage of Angélus on the market, except for the 2011, before it was promoted to the same rank as Ausone and Cheval-Blanc. But there are similar-scoring wines for lower prices.

Lynch-Bages One of the few estates to offer a smart price for its 2013, Lynch-Bages released its 2014 at €60 per bottle ex-negociant, up 20% on its 2013 release and equal to its 2012. With the exchange rate, that should translate to under $80 in U.S. retail prices, a 7 percent drop from last year. Wine Spectator gave the barrel sample 93 to 95 points, compared to 89 to 92 for the 2013. Lynch-Bages remains one of the better values for quality in Bordeaux.

Released April 28, 2015 (Exchange rate: 1€ = $1.097)

Mouton-Rothschild The first of the first-growths to release its 2014s, Mouton signaled that the campaign had officially begun. It priced its initial allotment at €240 ex-négociant, or $263. That's an 11 percent increase on its 2013 futures. After mark-ups by importers and the U.S. distribution system, 2014 Mouton futures are retailing for approximately $320 per bottle, or $3,840 per case. Wine Spectator rated the 2014 Mouton in barrel at 95 to 98 points versus 91 to 94 for its 2013. While the 2014 is priced 11 percent higher than the 2013 futures in euros, it's nearly 9 percent cheaper in dollars. That makes it the cheapest recent vintage of Mouton on the market, which should prove tempting to collectors with first-growth budgets.

Data compiled by Emma Balter

Château 2014 Score 2012 initial futures offering at U.S. retail 2013 initial futures offering at U.S. retail 2014 initial futures offering at U.S. retail 2012-2014 retail change 2013-2014 retail change
Angélus 93-96 $278 $268 $237 -15% -12%
Ausone NYR $582 $500 $480 -18% -4%
Beychevelle 91-94 $67 $65 $59 -13% -10%
Cheval-Blanc 96-99 $517 $478 $463 -10% -3%
Cos-d'Estournel NYR $138 $132 $114 -17% -13%
Issan 86-89 $47 $47 $43 -9% -9%
Ducru-Beaucaillou NYR $109 $110 $108 -1% -2%
Figeac 93-96 $78 $80 $83 +6% +4%
Evangile 93-96 $156 $167 $120 -23% -28%
Gazin 90-93 $64 $64 $55 -14% -14%
Giscours 90-93 $42 $42 $39 -6% -6%
Gruaud-Larose 89-92 $56 $58 $55 -2% -5%
Haut-Bailly NYR $66 $66 $59 -10% -10%
Haut-Brion 95-98 $373 $353 $315 -15% -11%
Hosanna 93-96 $140 N/A $112 -20% -
La Conseillante NYR $94 $94 $90 -4% -4%
La Fleur-Pétrus 94-97 $142 $110 - - -
La Mission Haut-Brion 93-96 $230 $196 $193 -16% -2%
La Mondotte 94-97 $153 $161 - - -
Lafite Rothschild 94-97 $534 $471 $422 -21% -10%
Léoville Barton 92-95 $70 $71 $61 -13% -14%
Léoville Las Cases 94-97 $130 $128 $131 +0.4% +2%
Léoville Poyferré 92-95 $71 $64 $62 -12% -3%
Lynch Bages 93-96 $96 $85 $81 -16% -5%
Margaux 94-97 $369 $352 $322 -13% -9
Montrose 94-97 $90 $95 $125 +39% +32%
Mouton-Rothschild 95-98 $374 $353 $326 -13% -8%
Palmer 93-96 $243 $244 $210 -14% -14%
Pape Clément 91-94 $79 $83 $70 -12% -16%
Pavie 94-97 $277 $268 $238 -14% -11%
Pavie Macquin 93-96 $57 $53 $57 0% +8%
Pétrus 95-98 $1,525 NA - - -
Pichon Baron 92-95 $99 $89 $88 -11% -1%
Pichon Lalande 92-95 $90 $98 $88 -2% -10%
Pontet-Canet NYR $93 $99 $89 -4% -10%
Rauzan-Ségla 89-92 $59 $56 $54 -8% -3%
Smith-Haut-Lafitte 93-96 $65 $65 $63 -4% -4%
Sociando-Mallet 89-92 $35 $30 $27 -22% -9%
Troplong Mondot 92-95 $84 $90 $79 -6% -12%
Valandraud 94-97 $127 N/A $120 -6% -
Vieux Château Certan 94-97 $146 $149 $146 0% -2%

NYR means a wine has not been submitted for review yet. N/A means a wine was not sold in sufficient quantities by U.S. retailers to determine an average price.

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