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Blogs  :  Stirring the Lees with James Molesworth

Blue-Blood Continuity Breeds Success

Grand-Puy-Lacoste serves as an actual home to some of France's Borie family

Posted: August 8, 2014  By James Molesworth

Wine Spectator senior editor James Molesworth is back in Bordeaux, this time to kick the dirt in the vineyards. Today he visited Grand-Puy-Lacoste in Pauillac.

Blogs  :  James Laube's Wine Flights

Golden State Oldies

Napa's Cabernets of yesteryear are experiencing a revival

Posted: August 7, 2014  By James Laube

There's a spirit of revival in California with older wines, with some vintners, many of them young, taking a keen interest in wines of yesteryear.

It's a healthy sign. "What's past is prologue" has merit in just about every aspect of life. Much of this new attention in California is directed toward Napa Valley Cabernets from the 1970s, and to a lesser extent the 1960s, because of the wines' reputations for longevity.

Blogs  :  Harvey Steiman At Large

Two Offbeat Wines Please a Crowd

Using insider knowledge to find a wine list's sweet spot

Posted: August 6, 2014  By Harvey Steiman

The wine list was in my hands, often the case when a bunch of us go out to dine. Comes with the work title. Champagne would have been easy to start with, but I was looking for something closer to $50 (not $100) that might be fun and delicious, and not an obvious choice. Two offbeat selections—a white from Oregon and a Nebbiolo from Italy—fit the bill.

Blogs  :  Exploring Wine with Tim Fish

Getting a Taste of California’s Forbidden Fruit

Rare delegation of Cuban sommeliers explores Napa and Sonoma counties

Posted: August 6, 2014  By Tim Fish

California wine is all but impossible to get in Cuba, and even harder to get than a good Cuban cigar here in California. That's why it was such a milestone when a delegation of Cuban sommeliers toured Napa and Sonoma counties last month to get a rare taste of Golden State wine. It was their first wine-buying trip since the United States government opened the Cuban market to American wine just last year.

Blogs  :  James Laube's Wine Flights

A Rumble in the Vineyards

Napa experienced a minor 3.2-magnitude earthquake this morning

Posted: August 5, 2014  By James Laube

Wine Spectator senior editor James Laube awoke to a 3.2-magnitude earthquake in Napa this morning.

Blogs  :  Mixed Case: Opinion and Advice

Napa Cabernet, Every Which Way

A visit to Hall shows just how brightly Cabernet can shimmer with site-specific nuance across Napa's varied terroirs

Posted: August 5, 2014  By Ben O'Donnell

Last month, I tasted five 2010 Cabernets at Hall winery, each from a different Napa appellation: St. Helena (Bergfeld, single-vineyard), Stags Leap District (single-vineyard), Diamond Mountain (two growers), Howell Mountain (two growers) and the Exzellenz Sacrashe Vineyard Rutherford. Some of these cuvées are new, but Hall now counts Cabernets from six different subappellations of Napa (all 95 to 100 percent Cabernet Sauvignon) and one from Sonoma. Together, they form a map of the valley as traced along the Cabernet in its veins.

Blogs  :  Stirring the Lees with James Molesworth

A Dozen Terroirs in One

In the famed l'Enclos of Bordeaux's Léoville-Las-Cases, a patchwork of soils is the secret

Posted: August 4, 2014  By James Molesworth

Wine Spectator senior editor James Molesworth is back in Bordeaux, taking a walk around the famed l'Enclos vineyard of Léoville Las Cases, with its diverse terroir.

Blogs  :  Harvey Steiman At Large

A Downside to Sharing Your Cellar

How to save the day when you choose the wrong bottle

Posted: July 30, 2014  By Harvey Steiman

Like many of us, my friend, let's call him Fred to protect the guilty, has acquired many more bottles of good wine for his cellar than he and his wife can possibly drink in their lifetimes. But for every bottle he gives away, he seems to get one in return. Which led to a potentially very awkward situation one night ...

Blogs  :  Stirring the Lees with James Molesworth

Here I Go Again. Again.

Back to Bordeaux, this time to kick the dirt in the vineyards at Château Lafaurie-Peyraguey in Sauternes

Posted: July 29, 2014  By James Molesworth

Wine Spectator senior editor James Molesworth is back in Bordeaux, this time to kick the dirt in the vineyards, starting at Château Lafaurie-Peyraguey in Sauternes.

Blogs  :  Mixed Case: Opinion and Advice

When Is a Wine No Longer Good to Drink?

Not until you've opened the bottle and decided for yourself

Posted: July 29, 2014  By Dana Nigro

Wine Spectator senior editor Dana Nigro answers the question, How do you know if a wine is still good to drink? (Open it!)

Blogs  :  Harvey Steiman At Large

Tasmania Sneaks Under the Radar

Slowly, Australia's southerly island might be making inroads in the United States

Posted: July 25, 2014  By Harvey Steiman

Tasmania, already a favorite among Australian wine drinkers for its crisp Chardonnays, juicy Pinot Noirs and bright sparkling wines, has made little impact in the U.S. Most of the wineries are small, so there isn't much volume to go around, and until recently the often-tart styles have not been able to find a welcome.

Most Americans have no clue where Tassie is. Says George Galey of American Estate Wines, which has had wines from the island in its import portfolio for 20 years, "I actually used to carry a world map around with me and asked people to point out Tasmania. Restaurateurs and retailers usually pointed to Madagascar." Only off by about 5,800 miles. That's changing.

Blogs  :  James Laube's Wine Flights

What Will the Future Hold for Quixote?

Carl Doumani has sold his Napa winery to Chinese interests

Posted: July 23, 2014  By James Laube

The decision about what wine to make is often as basic as what you like to drink and what you can sell. Winemakers figure if they make a wine they can't sell, they can drink it themselves. Up to a point.

Carl Doumani always liked Petite Syrah (his spelling), a drop in Napa Valley's bigger sea of Cabernet. When he bought the original Stags' Leap Winery property in 1971, it came with blocks of old-vine Petite that suited Doumani just fine. And true to his contrarian nature, he hung his white hat on Chenin Blanc, another old-time favorite that was losing steam. Selling those two wines amounted to paddling upstream as Cabernet and Chardonnay become the marquee wines of Napa, and favorites of American wine drinkers.

Blogs  :  Stirring the Lees with James Molesworth

The White Wine with the Red Name

In the tiny appellation of Cassis, Clos Ste.-Magdeleine offers stunning views and crisp, breezy whites and rosés

Posted: July 23, 2014  By James Molesworth

Wine Spectator senior editor James Molesworth is back in France. Today he visited Clos Ste.-Magdeleine in Cassis. Here are his notes on the white wine with a red name.

Blogs  :  Mixed Case: Opinion and Advice

Making It in the Big City

Can Long Island wines deliver in the crucible of the New York restaurant scene? Some somms' thoughts

Posted: July 22, 2014  By Ben O'Donnell

New York Restaurant Week is upon us in the city, a time when restaurants that are well north of my supper budget open their doors a little wider with prix-fixe specials. I always look for spots that offer wine specials as well, and in past years have found that New York wines are often given this platform to shine.

When I interviewed Long Island winemakers for my June 15 issue feature on the region, they felt confident that their wines could equal the best. But what did our high-end restaurant wine directors think?

Blogs  :  Stirring the Lees with James Molesworth

A 'La-La' Trio of Bandol's Own

An early look at the 2012 and 2013 reds from Domaine Tempier

Posted: July 22, 2014  By James Molesworth

Wine Spectator senior editor James Molesworth is back in France. Today he visited Domaine Tempier in Bandol. Here are his notes on the reds.

Blogs  :  Harvey Steiman At Large

How Le Bernardin Does It

A moment in the life of a new dish reflects the search to get things right

Posted: July 21, 2014  By Harvey Steiman

One key moment stands out when I was researching my Wine Spectator Aug. 31 issue profile of Eric Ripert, chef and partner of New York's fabled fish restaurant, Le Bernardin. It was the creative meeting.

Ripert and his top-ranking chefs meet daily in a small conference room, away from the hustle and bustle of the kitchen, to perfect their ideas for new dishes. The menu is constantly in flux. Anyone in the kitchen can present an idea, then work out the details until the results get the approval of Ripert and his lieutenants. They bring trays full of the latest iteration of the dish, along with some options they are considering, all in an effort to keep things fresh and lively.

Blogs  :  Stirring the Lees with James Molesworth

Domaine Tempier Rising

Bandol lifer Daniel Ravier takes a historic property to new heights

Posted: July 21, 2014  By James Molesworth

Wine Spectator senior editor James Molesworth is back in France. Today he visited Domaine Tempier in Bandol. Here are his notes.

Blogs  :  Robert Camuto: Letter from Europe

Brothers in Wine

In the shadow of Cannes, the monks’ island turns out high-end reds and whites

Posted: July 21, 2014  By Robert Camuto

Wine Spectator contributing editor Robert Camuto visits the Abbaye de Lérins, a Cistercian monastery on the tiny, idyllic island of Saint Honorat, about two miles and a 15-minute ferry ride off the yacht-jammed Cannes coast where winemaker Frère Marie turns out high-end reds and whites.

Blogs  :  Stirring the Lees with James Molesworth

From Dairy to Domaine

Domaine de la Tour du Bon has been a welcome change of pace for Agnès Henry

Posted: July 18, 2014  By James Molesworth

Wine Spectator senior editor James Molesworth is back in France. Today he visited Domaine de la Tour du Bon in Bandol to taste the recent vintages of rosé, red and white wine. Here are his notes.

Blogs  :  Mixed Case: Opinion and Advice

Don't Know Much About Enology

When it comes to wine, what's better: technical knowledge or on-the-job training?

Posted: July 17, 2014  By Mitch Frank

Wine has a duality of School of Books versus School of Real World. Once upon a not-so-long-ago time, most American sommeliers got their jobs because they were the only waiter who actually drank wine. "Like wine, kid?" the owner would ask one day, handing them the list. "You're wine director. Don't screw up."

As diners have grown more thirsty, sommeliers have gone to school. The Court of Master Sommeliers, in particular, has worked to raise standards by making sure more wine people receive proper training.

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