james laube

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Oct. 15, 2013 Issue  :  Features

Understanding Calera Pinots: From Vineyard to Bottle

Posted: October 15, 2013  By James Laube

Oct. 15, 2013 Issue  :  Features

True Grit

Josh Jensen's passion for Pinot Noir and quest for California limestone led him to the hinterlands of Mount Harlan and the peaks of Calera

Posted: October 15, 2013  By James Laube

Blogs  :  James Laube's Wine Flights

Reminiscing on a Day Immersed in the Pinot Noir Harvest

Thirty-four years ago, I worked one day of the Carneros Pinot Noir harvest

Posted: October 8, 2013  By James Laube

Before I made wine, I picked grapes.

Yesterday I relived my first harvest as I watched a crew pick a Pinot Noir vineyard in Carneros. The first time I picked grapes was in 1979, when I joined a team harvesting Pinot Noir at Winery Lake Vineyard, not far from where I watched yesterday morning's harvest.

News & Features  :  Tasting Highlights

11 Outstanding Rhône-Style Reds From California

New reviews of Syrah, Grenache and blends from the 2010 vintage

Posted: October 7, 2013  By James Laube

Blogs  :  James Laube's Wine Flights

Charles Woodson's Training Camp Hobby Becomes a Second Career

The All-Pro safety's first releases of TwentyFour by Charles Woodson Napa Cabernet earn outstanding marks

Posted: October 4, 2013  By James Laube

Charles Woodson, whose 2009 Calistoga Cabernet earned outstanding marks in last week's California Tasting Highlights, owes at least part of his fascination with wine to the Oakland Raiders. The 1997 Heisman Trophy winner was drafted in the first round in 1998 by the Raiders, who hold their training camp in the city of Napa, gateway to the valley. During a visit to Napa recently, Woodson presented all of his wines dating to the 2001 Merlot and the Cabernets from 2005 to 2009. All of the wines were exceptional.

Blogs  :  James Laube's Wine Flights

Technique Vs. Terroir

California and Oregon winemakers put terroir to the test with an interstate Pinot Noir exchange

Posted: October 2, 2013  By James Laube

Terroir can be an endlessly entertaining intellectual exercise. There’s little denying the role of the winemaker in creating any wine, but how does one measure that against the signature of the site? Here’s how a trio of Americans put terroir to a hands-on test.

The ground rules for the Cube Project were simple: three winemakers, three vineyards from three appellations, from three different vintages, 2010 to 2012. Each of the winemakers—Thomas Houseman of Anne Amie in Oregon’s Yamhill-Carlton appellation, Andrew Brooks of Bouchaine Vineyards in Carneros and Leslie Mead Renaud of Foley Estate and Lincourt in Santa Barbara—shared 6 tons of grapes (2 tons each) from their respective vineyards, resulting in nine different wines each year. Each winemaker determined the pick date of their vineyard, all from Pommard clones, meaning each winemaker started out with grapes at the same level of ripeness, measured in sugar, or Brix.

Sept. 30, 2013 Issue  :  Columns

The Great Bottle Test

Posted: September 30, 2013  By James Laube

News & Features  :  Tasting Highlights

12 Outstanding Napa Cabernets

New reviews of California Cabernets from the excellent 2009 vintage

Posted: September 23, 2013  By James Laube

Blogs  :  James Laube's Wine Flights

Drawbacks of a Bountiful Harvest: More Grapes, More Problems

The abundant 2013 California harvest is accelerating, and vintners are starting to wonder where they're going to put all those grapes

Posted: September 20, 2013  By James Laube

Too early and too much.

These are but two thoughts on the minds of many California vintners as harvest accelerates during what has been a largely uneventful season. Heat spikes haven't been a big issue; rain isn't expected to be a concern. The immediate weather forecast for the North Coast calls for milder temperatures over the next week, which will be a plus. All of that seemingly good news means vintners may be dealing with more than they bargained for.

Blogs  :  James Laube's Wine Flights

New TCA Study Confirms Suspicions

The cork taint compound actually shuts down our ability to smell a wine

Posted: September 19, 2013  By James Laube

A new study has revealed that 2,4,6-trichloroanisole, or TCA, the compound often responsible for corked wine, is responible for more than just that off-putting moldy aroma: TCA actually blocks our olfactory senses. That cork-tainted wine impedes our sense of smell is no surprise to me. It's something some of us have been witnessing for years now, even if we didn't have the scientific backing.

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